Breaking the project into stages

Breaking the project into stages

In a series of staged deliveries, the first delivery should be the germ of the ¡software that the project team will ultimately deliver. In subsequent releases, tiw project team adds more capabilities in a carefully planned way. The final software is delivered in the last stage. As Figure 11-1 suggests, within each stage, the project…

The Old Quarter of Hanoi

The Old Quarter of Hanoi

Hanoi has changed enormously since my first visit in 1994, but I still find it a beguiling city. The Old Quarter is as captivating as ever, while some of the revamped French colonial buildings are just stunning. I love wandering the intoxicating tangle of streets that make up Hanoi’s commercial heart Many streets are still…

Planning checkpoint review

Planning checkpoint review

 Planning is so critical to the success of a project that some experts report that a project’s ultimate success or failure is determined as early as 10 percent of the way through the project. Whether the exact number is 10 percent or some other number, very early in the project the project team should have…

Survival skills

Survival skills

 Software projects are inherently complex, and complex projects cannot succeed without careful planning. A well-planned project will be actively controlled, its progress will be visible, and its people will be given the support they need to do the project’s work. Software projects are also inherently risky, and they cannot succeed without active risk management. Involving…

Implications for project estimation

Implications for project estimation

 The cone of uncertainty has strong implications for software project estimation. It implies that it is not only difficult to estimate a project accurately in the early stages, it is theoretically impossible. At the end of the requirements development phase, the scope of the project will be determined by myriad decisions yet to be made…

Cone of uncertainty (2)

Cone of uncertainty (2)

 Before the project team has actually made the first set of decisions, it can only make the most general educated guess about the decisions that will be made later in the project. After the set of decisions at one level of granularity have been made, a team can make pretty accurate estimates of the kinds…

Cone of uncertainty (1)

Cone of uncertainty (1)

 One of the reasons that mistakes made early in a project cost 50 to 200 times as much to correct downstream as upstream is that the upstream decisions tend to be farther reaching than the downstream decisions.    Early in the project; a project team addresses the large issues like whether to suppoiif Windows NT…

Upstream, Downstream (3)

Upstream, Downstream (3)

 If the project team has an opportunity to correct a mistake at requirements time when the only work that has been done is the creation of a one- sentence requirements statement, it makes good sense for the team to correct that statement rather than to correct all the various manifestations of the inadequate requirements statement…

Upstream, Downstream (2)

Upstream, Downstream (2)

 Researchers have round that an error inserted into the project stream early—for example, an error in requiremerits specifitration or architecture— tends to cost 50 to 200 times as much to correct late in the project as it does to correct close to the point where it Was originally put into the stream. Figure 3-5 illustrates…

Upstream, Downstream (1)

Upstream, Downstream (1)

 Good software processes are designed to root out problems early in the project. This concept is important enough to discuss in some detail.   You’ll sometimes hear experienced software developers talk about the "upstream" and "downstream" parts of a software project. The word "upstream" simply refers to the early parts of a project such as…


Top